December 16, 2009

MIKULSKI, CARDIN ANNOUNCE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRANTS FOR MARYLAND COLLEGES

More than $1.3 million for Maryland STEM programs to help people prepare for jobs of the future

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Benjamin L. Cardin (both D-Md.) today announced the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded grants totaling $1.39 million to the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), Morgan State University and Towson University.

 

NSF grants work to promote the progress of science and to advance the national health, prosperity and welfare by supporting research and education in all fields of science and engineering. Senator Mikulski is Chairwoman of the Commerce, Justice, Science (CJS) Appropriations Subcommittee, which funds this grant program. Senator Cardin is a member of the Budget Committee, which each year sets priorities for funding to federal agencies.          

 

"Right now, our nation is in an amazing race - a race for discovery and new knowledge," said Senator Mikulski. " This federal investment will help foster breakthroughs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics that will lead to new products and new jobs.  Education is the engine of an innovative economy, and I'm proud that this money will keep Maryland in the lead and engage students in the careers of their future."

 

"America's future ability to compete and succeed globally depends on the investments in science, technology, engineering and math education that we make today. I am proud that these grants from the National Science Foundation will give more Maryland students an opportunity to focus their education and jumpstart their careers," said Senator Cardin.

 

The awards are as follows:

 

  • $474,390 for the University of Maryland, Baltimore County for merit-based scholarships for financially needy students
  • $600,000 for Morgan State University for scholarships for students studying electrical, civil and industrial engineering

 

  • $318,960 for Towson University for the Supporting Economically Disadvantaged Undergraduates in Physics program