August 09, 2016

Cardin, Mikulski, Maryland Congressional Delegation Urge Small Business Administration to Support Request For Physical Disaster Declaration For Howard County

WASHINGTON – U. S. Senators Ben Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski (both D-Md. ), together with U. S. Representatives Steny H. Hoyer, Elijah E. Cummings, Chris Van Hollen, C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger, John P. Sarbanes, Donna F. Edwards, Andy Harris and John Delaney today sent a letter to Maria Contreras-Sweet, Administrator of the Small Business Administration (SBA), urging her to approve Governor Larry Hogan’s request for a physical disaster declaration for Howard County after recent devastating flooding in Ellicott City.

 

“Ellicott City, a historic Maryland treasure known for its vibrant business community and its culture of kindness and resilience, suffered significant flooding throughout an intense rainfall on the evening of July 30, 2016. The National Weather Service predicts that a rainfall of this magnitude should statistically occur only once every one thousand years. Six inches of rain poured down on Ellicott City, an amount of rain that normally falls over the course of one month, in a period of only ninety minutes,” the Members wrote. “. . . This physical disaster determination is necessary to help ensure that small business owners can get the physical disaster loan assistance and economic injury disaster loan assistance they need. We urge you to expeditiously review Governor Hogan’s request and declare a physical disaster for Howard County, Maryland. ”

 

The SBA’s survey of Ellicott City found more than the 25 structures (with 40 percent or more uninsured damage) required to recommend an SBA physical declaration. At least 60 homeowners, renters and businesses in Ellicott City and the surrounding area sustained major damages or were destroyed. The disaster declaration is necessary to ensure Howard County business owners can get the physical disaster loan assistance and economic injury disaster loan assistance they need to repair or replace real estate, personal property, equipment or inventory damaged or destroyed in the disturbance.

 

The letter to Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet follows:

 

August 9, 2016

 

 

Maria Contreras-Sweet, Administrator

U. S. Small Business Administration

409 3rd Street SW

Washington, D. C. 20416

 

Dear Administrator Contreras-Sweet:

 

We are writing to express our shared support for Governor Larry Hogan’s request for the U. S. Small Business Administration to declare a physical disaster for Howard County, Maryland as a result of severe flooding which impacted Ellicott City on July 30, 2016. Given the massive impact that this flooding had on Ellicott City’s small businesses and residents, we respectfully request that you expeditiously approve this request.

 

Ellicott City, a historic Maryland treasure known for its vibrant business community and its culture of kindness and resilience, suffered significant flooding throughout an intense rainfall on the evening of July 30, 2016. The National Weather Service predicts that a rainfall of this magnitude should statistically occur only once every one thousand years. Six inches of rain poured down on Ellicott City, an amount of rain that normally falls over the course of one month, in a period of only ninety minutes.

 

We understand that SBA’s survey of Ellicott City has found more than the 25 structures (with 40% or more uninsured damage) required to recommend an SBA physical declaration. At least 60 homeowners, renters, and businesses in Ellicott City and the surrounding area sustained major damages or were destroyed. Over 82 structures had at least minor damages.

 

This physical disaster determination is necessary to help ensure that small business owners can get the physical disaster loan assistance and economic injury disaster loan assistance they need. We urge you to expeditiously review Governor Hogan’s request and declare a physical disaster for Howard County, Maryland. Thank you for your consideration of our request.

 

Sincerely,

 

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