May 13, 2008

CARDIN, MIKULSKI ANNOUNCE SCHOLARSHIP FUNDING FOR BALTIMORE COUNTY

Award focuses on science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Senators Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski (both D-Md.) today announced the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) in Essex, Md. has received $497,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support 20 annual scholarships to promote full-time enrollment and degree achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

 

"America's future ability to compete and succeed globally depends on the investments in science, technology, engineering and math education that we make today.   I am proud that this grant from the National Science Foundation will give students from the Community College of Baltimore additional tools and experiences they need to focus their education and jumpstart their careers," said Senator Cardin.  

 

"Right now, our nation is in an amazing race - a race for discovery and new knowledge, a race to remain competitive and to foster an innovation society.   At the heart of this race is education," said Senator Mikulski, Chairwoman of the Commerce, Justice, Science (CJS) Appropriations Subcommittee that funds the NSF.   "We must strengthen STEM education in this country in order to cultivate the students who will go on to generate the new workforce for the 21st century - the people who will create the new ideas that lead to new breakthroughs, new products and new jobs that will never leave the United States."

 

The CCBC will use the project award to recruit STEM students, especially women and underrepresented minorities, and to provide students with academic, career and professional development opportunities to transfer to 4-year institutions or employment.   Recruitment efforts will largely focus on local public schools and CCBC students currently enrolled in college algebra and science courses.  

           

Scholarship recipients will receive mentoring by STEM faculty, academic and career advising, a two-day summer career identification experience, a seminar series with a career lunch featuring a guest speaker each semester, networking opportunities with employers and prior awardees, Individual Academic Learning Plans, and optional STEM internships.

           

Senators Cardin and Mikulski strongly support an increased federal investment in the recruitment of students and faculty into STEM fields.   This will be particularly important as Maryland anticipates thousands of new employment opportunities as a result of the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) process.