March 28, 2016

Cardin Meets with Chief Judge Merrick Garland, Marylander and Nominee for Supreme Court Justice

“There are nine months left in this year and to suggest that we don’t have the time and the president doesn’t have the authority to appoint a nominee is an affront to the Constitution.”

 

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (D-Md.) met Monday with U.S. Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland, Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, a resident of Bethesda, Md. The two met for approximately 35 minutes, during which time they discussed the nomination process, key cases including Citizens United and Guantanamo Bay challenges, as well as the role of the Supreme Court in protecting the civil rights of Americans and the value of promoting pro bono legal work.

 

“Chief Judge Garland is a nominee for the Supreme Court and should be dealt with in this term of Congress,” said Senator Cardin. “It is not a matter for the next president and the next Congress; it is a matter for this president and this Congress. There are nine months left in this year and to suggest that we don’t have the time and the president doesn’t have the authority to appoint a nominee is absolutely outrageous – it is an affront to the Constitution.

 

“This nomination is not about popularity or politics, it is about finding the next justice who will advance the rule of law in this country, who will recognize the responsibility of the Supreme Court to be the final arbiter on constitutional issues and having a person who can bring about greater consensus among his colleagues. As more of my colleagues meet with Chief Judge Garland, they will see this as one of his many strengths. 

 

“We need to go through the process and give Chief Judge Garland a chance. I think it is hard to understand how you are excused from doing your job for nine months by not having a confirmation hearing and vote. I think more and more senators will come to that conclusion. The president did his job and it is now time for the Senate to do its job. The American people want to see nine justices on the Supreme Court when it convenes its new term in October.”